"Socialism" and how it is defined.

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"Socialism" and how it is defined.

Post by Left Adherent on Sat Aug 18, 2012 5:11 pm

I would like to know what your definition of socialism is. My reasons for this are because the media have corrupted various words such as socialism or Communism and I would like amass enough information to make a decision.
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Re: "Socialism" and how it is defined.

Post by Celtiberian on Sat Aug 18, 2012 5:36 pm

Socialism is far too broad a tradition to offer a concise definition of. In other words, it depends entirely on which specific current of socialism you follow. For example, I adhere to revolutionary syndicalism, which is simply workers' direct control of the means of production and distribution. Other currents include state socialism, free access communism, mutualism, etc.

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Re: "Socialism" and how it is defined.

Post by Red Aegis on Sat Aug 18, 2012 5:40 pm

It is a rather vague question, but what I think the biggest defining characteristic is the sharing of the ownership of the means of production. There are many ways that can be interpreted, and several I would agree with. There are also other facets that are usually attributed to Socialism, but they vary depending on whom you ask.

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Re: "Socialism" and how it is defined.

Post by Left Adherent on Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:49 am

Celtiberian wrote:Socialism is far too broad a tradition to offer a concise definition of. In other words, it depends entirely on which specific current of socialism you follow. For example, I adhere to revolutionary syndicalism, which is simply workers' direct control of the means of production and distribution. Other currents include state socialism, free access communism, mutualism, etc.

Isn't Revolutionary Syndicalism another term for Anarcho-Syndicalism? If that is so, what is the difference between Anarcho-Communism and Syndicalism?

Red Aegis wrote:It is a rather vague question, but what I think the biggest defining characteristic is the sharing of the ownership of the means of production. There are many ways that can be interpreted, and several I would agree with. There are also other facets that are usually attributed to Socialism, but they vary depending on whom you ask.

So how do you interpret socialism? Also, how does it link to left wing nationalism?
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Re: "Socialism" and how it is defined.

Post by Celtiberian on Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:30 pm

Left Adherent wrote:Isn't Revolutionary Syndicalism another term for Anarcho-Syndicalism?

Revolutionary syndicalism precedes anarcho-syndicalism, and it can roughly be divided into two currents: Sorelian and DeLeonist—both of which advocated economic syndicalism (i.e., workers' direct control of the means of production and distribution). Initially, revolutionary syndicalism was simply a theory of industrial unionism, whereby workers who dismissed the potential of achieving socialism by way of participation in parliament instead sought to advance the revolution via direct action. Several members of the established European socialist parties who had also became disillusioned with reformism eventually joined these workers, thereafter becoming instrumental in syndicalism's theoretical development. (Georges Sorel and Stanisław Brzozowski, for example, were well known exponents of this current of revolutionary syndicalism.)

The other current is best typified by James Connolly and Daniel DeLeon, who developed the theory further and suggested more of a dual approach, whereby both industrial unionism and participation in politics would be utilized to abolish the dictatorship of capital and to construct a syndicalist mode of production. (I identify with this tradition.)

Anarchists became involved in syndicalism quite early in the movement's history, but anarchism is distinct from revolutionary syndicalism insofar as the latter abstained from taking a definitive stance on issues pertaining to national territories, and so forth.

If that is so, what is the difference between Anarcho-Communism and Syndicalism?

Anarcho-communism is generally associated with Peter Kropotkin's theory of free access communism—which I consider untenable at this point in history, incidentally. Anarcho-syndicalists, on the other hand, were/are more willing to experiment with different methods of remuneration (e.g., labor vouchers), and also stressed the importance of industrial unionism somewhat more than did the anarcho-communists.

Also, how does it link to left wing nationalism?

Left-wing nationalism is basically a theory of how the working class will organize international relations following the revolution. I recommend reading this thread if you're interested in a thorough explanation of it.

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"The dogma of human equality is no part of Communism . . . the formula of Communism: 'from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs', would be nonsense, if abilities were equal."
—J. B. S. Haldane Hammer Sickle

"Nationality. . . is a historic, local fact which, like all real and harmless facts, has the right to claim general acceptance. . . Every people, like every person, is involuntarily that which it is and therefore has a right to be itself. . . Nationality is not a principle; it is a legitimate fact, just as individuality is. Every nationality, great or small, has the incontestable right to be itself, to live according to its own nature. This right is simply the corollary of the general principle of freedom."
—Mikhail Bakunin Red Star
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